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Kiner said. "Yeah, sure. He only hit .388 in
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BOSTON -- A playoff hockey classic was shoved to the backburner Friday as Canadiens and Bruins players and coaches found themselves addressing the ugly issue of racism. Los Angeles Angels Jerseys . Montreal defenceman P.K. Subban, who is black, was targeted for racial abuse on social media in the wake of his winning goal in Thursdays thrilling 4-3 double-overtime playoff win over Boston. "Im shocked," Montreal coach Michel Therrien told reporters Friday. "Honestly Im shocked to hear those type of comments." "No one deserves to be treated like this," he added. "And P.K. has all our support." Many comments with racist and derogatory terms were posted on Twitter and other social media websites after the victory. The 24-year-old Subban, a slick-skating defenceman who is one of the NHLs most exciting players, scored twice as Montreal won the opener of the best-of-seven second-round series. Subban was not made available by the Canadiens, who had a closed gym session instead of a practice Friday thanks to the tight turnaround between Thursdays extended Game 1 and the afternoon start for Game 2 Saturday. Montreal brought out four players, all of whom decried the abuse of their teammate. "I just think its unacceptable," said defenceman Mike Weaver. "Its just classless." Forward David Desharnais echoed his coach. "Nobody deserves to be treated like that. It has nothing to do with sports or anything," he said. Weaver, like the other Habs players who met the media, blamed the ugliness on "a few individuals." Boston was quick to denounce those responsible. "The racist, classless views expressed by an ignorant group of individuals following Thursdays game via digital media are in no way a reflection of anyone associated with the Bruins organization," team president Cam Neely said in a statement. Boston coach Claude Julien also spoke out against those behind the abuse. "Its just poor judgment, poor taste, and we dont associate ourselves with people like that, and people who think that way are not what we call our fans," he told reporters at the Bruins practice facility. "They may think they are, but we certainly dont support that at all. "Its a shame that this is still going around in this day and age, and that people are still thinking that way." In a week that saw a Spanish soccer fan throw a banana at Barcelona defender Dani Alves, the torrent of abuse aimed at Subban was a painful reminder that hate knows no boundaries. "Youd like to think that it wouldnt happen but it does," said Montreal forward Brendan Gallagher. "Its still part of the life and part of the world ... I think it is getting better. I think its a very small group of people. It doesnt represent the National Hockey League in any way. We have great fans." Said Julien: "Theres a lot of good fans out there, and thats the sad part about it is that, you know, your good fans get tarnished because of comments like that from people who dont belong in that same group." The abuse was an embarrassment on several levels for the Bruins, who drafted Subbans younger brother Malcolm. Asked if the Boston organization plans to reach out to the younger Subban, a goalie, Julien replied: "I think were reaching out to everybody in that situation. You know, weve got Jarome Iginla on our team. Lets be realistic here about this. Its something we dont support." Gallagher said P.K. Subban was professional in handling the abuse. "He understands the best way to handle it is just ignore it," he said. "And understand that their opinions dont really mean anything." "He shakes it off pretty good," added Desharnais. Montreal Mayor Denis Coderre called the remarks "unfortunate", saying he would not defend the undefendable. "We will answer back with the goals that we score," Coderre told reporters Friday at Montreal city hall. The mayor also had a few words for Boston fans, saying there are some who will try to destabilize the Habs. "They will try with all kinds of insults, (both) acceptable and unacceptable, but we wont fall into their trap," Coderre said. Boston Mayor Marty Walsh said in a statement that the offensive tweets were "a disgrace." "These racist comments are not reflective of Boston, and are not reflective of Bruins fans. Ive said before that the best hockey in the world happens when the Bruins and Canadiens play each other, and there is no room for this kind of ignorance here." The racial abuse wasnt the only fan misbehaviour on the night. Some in the building reacted to the overtime loss by throwing drinks and garbage at the Canadiens as they left the ice. "Its Boston, its the rivalry. They dont like (it) when were winning, I guess," said Desharnais. "Thats just Boston." "We come here, we dont expect to be cuddled," he added. Therrien, who is one of the first off the bench, said he had not noticed the cascade of garbage. As to how the rest of the Habs reacted, Desharnais said: "We just got off the ice pretty quick." Subban, meanwhile, restricted his Twittter activity Friday to a tweet directing followers to check out a link to one of his sponsors. But he addressed the issue of racism in a 2012 interview on "George Stroumboulopoulos Tonight." "Ive been playing hockey since I was two-and-a-half, three years old. And theres been a number of those incidents. And theyre just stupid people really, to be honest with you," he said. "Hockeys filled with great people, and its a great sport, and I encourage a lot of people to play it because of the relationships that you make in hockey. Those are the things that Id rather talk about than all those other things, because theyre just ignorant people." When Stroumboulopoulos cited fans throwing bananas at black soccer players, Subban said "Id probably just pick it up and eat it." Which is exactly what Alves did this week, to worldwide acclaim. Kole Calhoun Jersey .com) - NFL owners have unanimously approved the sale of the Buffalo Bills. Nolan Ryan Jersey . Jones, from Winnipeg, built a 3-0 advantage after three ends by scoring two in the second and one in the third. Chinas skip Bingyu Wang cut that lead to 3-1 in the fourth before Canada added another three in the fifth for a 6-1 lead. http://www.baseballangelslockroom.com/yunel-escobar-angels-jersey/ . Heck, we might just miss the BCS. Maybe? It sort of worked out this season. Top-ranked Florida State (13-0) was the only team to get through the regular season unbeaten, and the Seminoles did it in dominating fashion.NEW YORK -- Ralph Kiner was a smash as a slugger, launching so many home runs over the left-field wall at old Forbes Field that fans nicknamed it his corner. Years later, as one of baseballs most beloved broadcasters, he became a big hit in a new "Kiners Korner." Kiner, the Hall of Famer whose frequent malaprops endeared him to New York Mets listeners for more than a half-century, died Thursday. He was 91. The Hall of Fame said Kiner died at his home in Rancho Mirage, Calif., with his family at his side. "He was a jewel," Mets Hall of Famer Tom Seaver said. Kiner hit 369 home runs during a 10-year career cut short by back problems. He debuted with Pittsburgh in 1946 and won or tied for the National League lead in homers in each of his first seven seasons. He was popular off the field, too. His Hollywood pals included Bing Crosby and Frank Sinatra, he squired Liz Taylor and Janet Leigh, and he played himself in the 1951 film "Angels in the Outfield." Kiner became a Mets announcer in their expansion season of 1962, working 17 years as a trio with Bob Murphy and Lindsey Nelson. Kiner called their games for 52 years in all, including a handful of them last season. Kiner was already a fixture on the Mets airwaves when he was inducted into the Hall in 1975. He was elected with just one vote to spare in his 15th and final year on the Baseball Writers Association of America ballot. The six-time All-Star outfielder still ranks sixth all-time with a home run every 14.1 at-bats. He averaged more than 100 RBIs per season and hit .279 with the Pirates, the Chicago Cubs and Cleveland. When he retired, Kiner was sixth on the career home run list. To generations of TV viewers and radio listeners, his postcareer acclaim was as great as the honours he earned on the field. "Kiners Korner" was a delight for players and fans alike, where stars would join Kiner for postgame chats. "I loved going on Kiners Korner. I enjoyed talking baseball with Ralph, especially learning about players from his era," former Mets star Dwight Gooden said. "But what really made it special was every time you went on, you got a $100. For a rookie like me in 1984, a $100 was a big deal." Kiner was known for tripping over his own words, and often laughed about his own comments. "If Casey Stengel were alive today, hed be spinning in his grave," he once commented after a misplay. "On Fathers Day, we again wish you all a happy birthday," he also said. Then there was the time Gary Carter hit a winning home run in the 10th inning of his Mets debut in 1985 and Kiner introduced him as Gary Cooper, the famed actor. "Gary was a great sport about it," Kiner remembered. "He came on Kiners Korner afterward and introduced himself to me as Gary Cooper and even signed a picture to me, Gary Cooper Carter." His observations were pretty astute, too. Talking about a former Gold GGlove outfielder, Kiner remarked: "Two-thirds of the earth is covered by water. Martin Maldonado Jersey. The other third is covered by Garry Maddox." Kiner had a stroke about a decade ago that slowed his speech, but remained an occasional part of the Mets announcing crew. Fellow announcers such as Keith Hernandez and Ron Darling always brightened when Kiner was alongside them. Younger fans who were born long after Kiner retired also reveled in his folksy tales. "As one of baseballs most prolific power hitters for a decade, Ralph struck fear into the hearts of the best pitchers of baseballs Golden Era despite his easygoing nature, disarming humility and movie-star smile," Hall President Jeff Idelson said in a statement. "His engaging personality and profound knowledge of the game turned him into a living room companion for millions of New York Mets fans who adored his game broadcasts and later Kiners Korner for more than half a century," he said. "He was as comfortable hanging out in Palm Springs with his friend Bob Hope as he was hitting in front of Hank Greenberg at Forbes Field." As a teen, hanging around the Hollywood Stars in the Pacific Coast League, Kiner shook hands with Babe Ruth and talked ball with Ty Cobb. In high school, he hit a home run off Satchel Paige during a barnstorming tour. After serving as a Navy pilot in World War II, Kiner had a strong rookie year and won the NL homer title with 23, beating Johnny Mize by one. He really broke loose the next year, hitting 51 home runs with 127 RBIs while batting .313. Stuck on poor teams, Kiner never made it to the post-season. He made his mark in All-Star games, homering in three straight. Kiner connected in the 1950 showcase at Comiskey Park, but made more noise with another ball he hit in the game. He hit a long drive to the base of the scoreboard in left-centre field and Ted Williams broke his left elbow making the catch, causing him to miss two months. "Williams always said I ruined his batting stroke, that he could never hit after that," Kiner said. "Yeah, sure. He only hit .388 in 57." Mets owner Fred Wilpon remembered Kiner as "one of the most beloved people in Mets history -- an original Met and extraordinary gentleman." "His knowledge of the game, wit, and charm entertained generations of Mets fans. Like his stories, he was one of a kind," he said. "Our sport and society today lost one of the all-time greats." The Mets named the home TV booth at Shea Stadium in his honour. The Pirates retired Kiners No. 4. "All of us at the Pittsburgh Pirates have heavy hearts upon learning of Ralph Kiners passing," the team said in a statement. Ralph McPherran Kiner was born on Oct. 27, 1922. He was first married to tennis star Nancy Chaffee. Following their divorce he married Barbara George, and following another divorce he married DiAnn Shugart, who died in 2004. Wholesale NFL T-shirts Cheap Jerseys Free Shipping NFL Jerseys Wholesale China NFL Gear Wholesale NFL Camo Jerseys Cheap NFL Hoodies Camo China NFL Jerseys ' ' '


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